www.GOmoorea.com - Official web site of Moorea visitor's bureau - Sister Island of Tahiti, South Pacific.  
 
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Moorea, like the other Polynesian islands, was populated by navigators who arrived in large double outrigger canoes from Southeast Asia approximately 1000 years ago.
 

     • Geography
     • Climate
     • The language
     • Church service
     • Economy
     • Environment

 
In the 18th Century, Moorea was known as AIMEHO. At the origin of the name change, was the vision a Great Priest had on a “marae” of a beautiful yellow lizzard (i.e. MO’OREA in Tahitian).  

Marae are ancient stone or coral pyramid-shaped constructions with several layers, on which sacrifices sometimes took place. The oldest Marae in Moorea is the Afareaitu Marae, it dates back to year 900. You can easily visit the Marae on the road to the mountain viewpoint.
The first Europeans arrived during the 18th century, the Englishman Samuel WALLIS, the Frenchman Antoine de BOUGAINVILLE, and the famous Captain James COOK in 1777.

The Protestant and Catholic missionaries converted the inhabitants who are still regular churchgoers. The French Protectorate was established in 1842 and re-organized in 1848 and 1851.

Since 1984, French Polynesia has a statute of internal self-government, with a Territorial House of Commons, a Government with its President, Oscar Temaru since 2004, replacing Gaston Flosse, who had been leading the country for 20 years.

 

Marae

The Bounty

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Mou'a puta
 


Moorea is an island of volcanic origin, situated 12 nautical miles to the Northwest of Tahiti. Total area = 3,2618 acres and 37.3 miles around. Sports lovers can bike around the island in half a day. Mt Tohiea, 3,959ft is the highest mountain. Among the other peaks are the Moua Puta (the mountain with a hole) 2,722ft, the Rotui (between Opunohu and Cook’s Bay) 2,624 ft, and the Moua Roa 2,499 ft (called Bali Hai after the American film South Pacific) Moorea’s lagoon, together with

Bora Bora’s is one of the most beautiful in the Society Islands. It harbors 3 “motus”(small coral islands within the lagoon) and all kinds of water sports can be practiced. Viewed from the sea by boat, Moorea is even more beautiful Moorea’s lagoon, together with Bora Bora’s is one of the most beautiful in the Society Islands. It harbors 3 “motus”(small coral islands within the lagoon) and all kinds of water sports can be practiced. Viewed from the sea by boat, Moorea is even more beautiful

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The average temperature is 79,9°F, and rarely goes above 89,6°F. The prevailing winds are the easterly trade winds. In winter (june to September) the Maraamu is a cool wind which blows from the southeast. The rainy season extends variably from December to April (alternating sunny and rainy spells).
See www.meteo.pf

  Rainbow

Average temperature

January
28°C

February
28°C

March
27°C

April
27°C

May
26°C

June
24°C

July
24°C

August
25°C

September
26°C

October
26°C

November
27°C

December
28°C

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Temple  
Tahiti’s official language is French, but most of the Tahitians speak Reo Mao’hi among themselves. English is however spoken in all hotels and most tourist-oriented businesses.
See glossary.
  


Protestant: 80 % of the Society islands population is protestant. The fist temple, in Papetoai was rebuild in 1867 on the remnants of the old one.
Maharepa, Teavaro, Afareaitu, Haapiti and Papetoai, mass on Sundays at 10:00 am.
Catholic: On Sundays, mass at 10:00 am at Pao Pao, 8:00 at Papetoai, 7:30 at Haapiti and saturday at 6:00pm at Afareaitu

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Polynesian economy is based on tourism and Tahiti’s cultured pearls, the two main resources completed by France’s financial funds transfers originated by the nuclear testings that started in the 60’s and stopped in 1996. Moorea lives off its agriculture, fishing and tourism. Farming is mainly dedicated to pineapples, vanilla, citrus fruits, a little livestock farming in Opunohu’s Bay and the valleys.
  Fishing of the day

A great variety of tropical fruit, pineapples, grapefruits, bananas, oranges, lemons, papayas, guavas, mangoes, made possible the opening of a fruit juices factory. More than 17,000 inhabitants, essentially Polynesian or “demi” (mixed blood), live on Moorea, scattered all around the island and in the valleys. 48% of the population are under 20. The main employing sectors are fishing, agriculture (mainly pineapple growing) and tourism, but many people go to Tahiti to work every day

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Corals  
Our coral and mountain ecosystems are fragile. Help us protect them. Use public bins. Respect coral, plants and cultivations. Don’t break, collect or pick them up. Thank you.
The "Te Mana o te Moana" organization's mission is about conservation, research, coral rehabilitation and communication related to the Polynesain ecosystem.It is indeed important to help the sensitization to the fragility of our ecosystem.
The PGEM is also a legal way of preserving the lagoon and its fauna.
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